19th October 2014

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Dear Tumbr,
I have not as of yet read the Divergent series. I have managed to lead a tumblr life relatively free of spoilers about things I do not want spoiled. UNTIL NOW! So thanks for that really awesome recommendation, hidden among the many posts I casually read as I scroll down my main wall… NOT! Damn you damn you damn you damn you. I now know a person can never know how pissed they will be about a spoiler they never thought of being shoved in their face until it happens, and boy has it happened.
Signed,
A Very Unhappy Me

Dear Tumbr,

I have not as of yet read the Divergent series. I have managed to lead a tumblr life relatively free of spoilers about things I do not want spoiled. UNTIL NOW! So thanks for that really awesome recommendation, hidden among the many posts I casually read as I scroll down my main wall… NOT! Damn you damn you damn you damn you. I now know a person can never know how pissed they will be about a spoiler they never thought of being shoved in their face until it happens, and boy has it happened.

Signed,

A Very Unhappy Me

Tagged: spoilerstumblrhere's a blogsucks

8th October 2014

Audio post

Tagged: joan armatrading

Source: Spotify

8th October 2014

Photoset reblogged from Can't You At Least Be Civilized with 254,442 notes

littlebluboxx:

silentauroriamthereal:

nofreedomlove:

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"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti

When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 

Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 

"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."

Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 

"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."

Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.

One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.

It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.

"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.

Oooh. I reblogged a partial version of this recently but I didn’t know how many more there were! I LOVE these!

OK SO THERE ARE TONS MORE OF THESE OF THE ARTISTS FB PAGE. GUYS THESE ARE AWESOME.image

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LETS APPLAUD CAROL ROSSETTI EVERYONEimage

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Tagged: sooo goodcarol rossetti

Source: nofreedomlove

1st October 2014

Photo reblogged from with 85 notes

Yelle + Prince + 3RDEYEGIRL = One good day of music while I work

Yelle + Prince + 3RDEYEGIRL = One good day of music while I work

Tagged: Sooo much good

29th September 2014

Audio post with 1 note

Been listening to this album a ton lately ever since I set up my turntable. Sooo good.

Tagged: joan armatradingsooo goodlove and affection

Source: Spotify

29th September 2014

Link with 4 notes

My Onion Night: A Game of Thrones Tale - youngjarvis - A Song of Ice and Fire - George R. R. Martin [Archive of Our Own] →

Dirty GoT Fanfiction that brings a smile to my face. Cause what’s better than the devotion between Stannis the Mannis and Ser Davos, his onion knight. 

Tagged: stavosgame of thronesarchive of our ownmy onion nightstannis baratheonstannis the mannisser davosdavos seaworthstannis x davosfanficnsfwmy friends are awesome

9th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from Uthor with 28 notes

uthor:

Lumberjanes #3 by Grace Ellis, Moelle Stevenson, and Brooke A Allen

I am so excited to start reading this comic!

Tagged: arm wrestlingawesomeeegreat comics

9th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from Can't You At Least Be Civilized with 40,531 notes

thewomanfromitaly:

socialjusticekoolaid:

Today in Solidarity: Protesters gather in Oakland against the Urban Shield conference and police militarization

Ever wonder where cities get all their fancy ideas on how to militarize their police force? It’s not just from the Pentagon— it’s conferences like Urban Shield, that highlight the latest in tactical equipment and practices for suppressing the very people you’re sworn to serve. #staywoke #whodoyouprotect #whodoyouserve 

„,this is the most fucking disgusting thing I have ever seen

Source: socialjusticekoolaid

4th September 2014

Photo reblogged from Can't You At Least Be Civilized with 1,223 notes

thatssoscience:

Representation Matters: Doc McStuffins
As you know, I am such a fan of media representation for women in STEM, but I haven’t given fair credit to the amazing Doc McStuffins! I feel like I’ve been living under a rock, but this little girl is absolutely perfect. She’s the daughter of a doctor and takes the things she learns from her mom and applies them to her own practice, Her toy practice! She’s smart, curious and according to show creator Chris Nee, she’s also a “strong, assertive character who’s going places in life”. In one episode she was struggling with a diagnosis for one of her patients, but that didn’t get her down. “I won’t give up, until I figure it out!” she cried! She is just the role model pre-school kids deserve.
While she’s teaching kids about health and hygiene, she also making a huge impact. Doc McStuffins is a top rated-program for the 2-5 age group. Little boys and girls love her; merchandise of the show garnered more than $500 million in sales last year. I can’t go to a restaurant or a grocery store anymore without seeming some kid toting her doll around. She’s everywhere!
While she’s awesome and adorable, most importantly she’s a great role model for young girls, especially for girls of color. There is a disproportionately low number of women in STEM, but there’s an even less women of color in STEM fields. Women of color make up about 7% of employed scientists and only 1.9% of the nation’s doctors.
“It’s so powerful to show representation of somebody who’s not usually on TV”, show creator Chris Nee spoke of this importance in a recent interview with MSNBC. Representation matters. Women, especially young people, need to see themselves in the characters they see. It gives them to the chance to say “I could do that, I could be that”. Even Disney executives admit the power media has on the way people, especially kids, see the world. So for a character like Doc McStuffins, a little girl of color who is interested in STEM, to have all the force of the Disney brand behind her, is something to truly celebrate!  

thatssoscience:

Representation Matters: Doc McStuffins

As you know, I am such a fan of media representation for women in STEM, but I haven’t given fair credit to the amazing Doc McStuffins! I feel like I’ve been living under a rock, but this little girl is absolutely perfect. She’s the daughter of a doctor and takes the things she learns from her mom and applies them to her own practice, Her toy practice! She’s smart, curious and according to show creator Chris Nee, she’s also a “strong, assertive character who’s going places in life”. In one episode she was struggling with a diagnosis for one of her patients, but that didn’t get her down. “I won’t give up, until I figure it out!” she cried! She is just the role model pre-school kids deserve.

While she’s teaching kids about health and hygiene, she also making a huge impact. Doc McStuffins is a top rated-program for the 2-5 age group. Little boys and girls love her; merchandise of the show garnered more than $500 million in sales last year. I can’t go to a restaurant or a grocery store anymore without seeming some kid toting her doll around. She’s everywhere!

While she’s awesome and adorable, most importantly she’s a great role model for young girls, especially for girls of color. There is a disproportionately low number of women in STEM, but there’s an even less women of color in STEM fields. Women of color make up about 7% of employed scientists and only 1.9% of the nation’s doctors.

“It’s so powerful to show representation of somebody who’s not usually on TV”, show creator Chris Nee spoke of this importance in a recent interview with MSNBC. Representation matters. Women, especially young people, need to see themselves in the characters they see. It gives them to the chance to say “I could do that, I could be that”. Even Disney executives admit the power media has on the way people, especially kids, see the world. So for a character like Doc McStuffins, a little girl of color who is interested in STEM, to have all the force of the Disney brand behind her, is something to truly celebrate!  

Tagged: yessss!the only thing that makes me wish the kid i nanny watched tv

Source: thatssoscience

2nd September 2014

Photo reblogged from any place but my mouth. with 2 notes

any-place-but-my-mouth:

YOU DON’T HAVE TO…

http://any-place-but-my-mouth.tumblr.com/about

any-place-but-my-mouth:

YOU DON’T HAVE TO…

http://any-place-but-my-mouth.tumblr.com/about

Tagged: m&mscandyfooddietbingerecoveryeating disorderanorexiabulimiaendosthinspogifanyplacebutmymouthprojectfemale artistawesomeartsooo goodtags that make me uncomfortable